So, what’s new?

So, what’s new?

After having completed another course sponsored by Yad Vashem on Holocaust Studies, I took off for the green land known as Canada. I was refreshed and delighted by sweet weather and my dear family and then it was time to come home to Kibbutz Nir-Oz.

Good to be back? Well, of course to hug my beloved children.

But in other news, as has been shown by ynet.com, it’s been a few days of constant listening. I carry out conversations in person, on the phone and in my head while  I periodically note booms and more booms. I await the call of the Red Alert from the regional system or from our Kibbutz located factory, and I carry on.

Newspaper reports don’t always acknowledge the rocketfire that goes on during the day. There are bigger rockets or more noteworthy landings near the big cities of Ashkelon and Be’er Sheva or even Ofakim. But those reports also engage my attention. There’s a kind of dual perception that sneaks into one’s life – the immediate engagements of the moment and the secondary reality of sporadic and possible danger.

Those with ADHD are the winners – those lucky folks gifted with multiple attention spans – no problem – they’re well rehearsed for these times.

Those who are more linear – who like their days piled neatly – are more shaken.

How do you categorize yourself? Could you keep the zen during these times?

Oh, and if you have facebook, perhaps you’d like to join my friend Adele’s new group: Life on the Border with Gaza, Things People May not Know (but should)

& may it be a peaceful weekend

-judih, August 26, 2011

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T’ai Chi! Doron Lavie answers questions

During T’ai Chi practice, questions arise during the break. Sometimes a question leads to many stories ranging from Masters all over the world to specific anecdotes regarding health. Ruthy, one of those who regularly comes to practice T’ai Chi posed 3 health questions to Doron.

Mickey and Doron doing the Sword Cutta

Doron Lavie answers questions (transl from original Hebrew by judih)

  Does T’ai Chi affect one’s posture and balance

Doron: Absolutely. Studies that have been conducted on practicing adults in various locations in the world over a 3-month period (note: adults with no previous history of having done T’ai Chi), compared with groups of adults who engaged in alternate forms of movement strategies. The T’ai Chi group showed 15-17% fewer falls or diagnosed physical damage in conducting their daily lives.

2. Are there standards of physiology that can be measured after practicing T’ai Chi?

D: There are many studies available of research, observations and experiments on the effects of T’ai chi on health, agility and motor skills. The most studied are: the Cardiovascular system (heart and circulatory), the Nervous system (mostly brain and memory). One of the pioneers in the field and a real ‘Nut’ in in the field of Stress Management and the spirit, is a teacher of T’ai Chi, Lawrence Galante. In his book “T’ai Chi the Supreme Ultimate” he’s devoted an entire chapter to this, bringing inspirational examples of those who have been affected by T’ai Chi. It’s possible to find a wide network of detailed information, if anyone is interested in examining the data.

3. Is it accurate to say that practicing T’ai Chi can lower high blood pressure?

A: Yes, that’s correct and in fact the practice of T’ai Chi has a positive and significant effect on your heart’s health and maintaining the balance of blood flow.

Ruthy S.

Idud: A successful approach to ADHD | health

Idud: A successful approach to ADHD | health.

A new national training program stresses encouragement and positive optimism for Jewish and Arab children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

Thanks to an educational program initiated by an American immigrant, the outlook is brighter for scores of Jewish and Arab Israeli children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a common neurological condition causing inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity.

Idud (Encouragement) began as a pilot project in one religious and three secular elementary schools, says its founder, clinical psychologist and educator Stuart (Simcha) Chesner.

Please click onto the link to read how one man’s determination has opened the window to awareness and treatment for students with ADHD.

Interview with Doron Lavie, Teacher of T’ai Chi, Chi Cong, Zen Meditation and more

Doron Lavie

Doron Lavie, teacher of T’ai Chi, Chi Cong, Zen meditation, kung fu and practitioner of holistic healing has won championships in Tokyo in T’ai Chi, and has worked with many populations bringing the benefits of his knowledge and experience to a wide variety of populations. I, myself, have been studying with him since 1993 when he first began classes on Kibbutz Nir-Oz. I was fortunate that Doron agreed to be interviewed and am happy to share his answers to my questions.

J: What is T’ai Chi, Doron?

Doron: A Chinese Martial Art, definitely martial arts combined with awareness. It works on our quality of life: how to use the body, the mind and  how to use them well.

J: What are its origins?

D. In early Chinese history, there evolved the idea that the world  and its processes work according to the principle of yin and yang. The I Ching developed at the same time, according to the same principles.  Everything is balanced. This balance of power controls everything in the world.

These two principles are not opposite as some may think, but rather they complement each other. It is our task to find the balance between them and in all areas of life, we need to maintain that balance. Along with that, we endeavour to learn more about our bodies in accordance with the same principles and rules.  The Chinese, who originated this point of view, realized that the cosmos and the body work in the same way: the body being a microcosmos of the same guiding principles.

This philosophy led to the development of different branches. Some were religious, as happens in all cultures, some were mental processes, such as meditation, without a religious element, some were physical exercises or sports, and eventually developed therapeutic branches such as chi cong, acupuncture, etc.

T’ai chi fits combines physical movement with awareness.

J: Who can benefit from t’ai chi?

D: Everybody! Everybody who truly cares for him/herself, who values their quality of life can benefit.

J: How often does one have to practice it?

D: There are many people who practice once or twice a week, but the more the better, in accordance with one’s schedule, time and how long one can invest. As in most things, people who are attracted to t’ai chi and see results from their practice, tend to practise and develop a regular routine.

Eliyahu and Doron doing Sword Cutta

Background: Full Name: Doron Lavie 

Place of Birth: Jerusalem 

Current Residence: Lehavim, Community Settlement

Favourite Childhood memory: There are many to choose from. When I was growing up, I was surrounded by nature. That is what I remember, that and my family life – which was very strong, very enjoyable. I loved our family trips into nature.

 J:  When did you first become interested in T’ai Chi?

It’s hard to say directly. Not specifically T’ai Chi, but, at a young age, I was interested in seeking something “more”. As an adolescent, it didn’t seem right that there was just daily life and nothing beyond it. I always looked for something more. At first, I tried looking for it in religion and I went in that direction. Up till today, I’m connected to it. I’m not orthodox,  nor do I keep Shabbat in the religious sense, but I feel religious. I say the Kiddush (Kaddish) and I live my daily life in a ‘God-awareness’; that there’s no such thing as randomness, but rather there exists some kind of larger order. While on this search, I found many things. Yoga was good for me, and I discovered meditation which I continued while in the army and afterwards. Then a friend invited me to observe t’ai chi and I’d never seen anything like that before. I was enchanted and I went again and again and continued. And that was that. That was my connection. I connected to my teacher, who was very special. He combined mental/spiritual/meditation work with exercise. He taught the total concept of doing holistic work.

J:  Who were your first teachers?

First teacher? Tzvi Weisberg, an American, who wanted to immigrate to Israel. He was the first to make tofu in Israel; he would sit and prepare it as it is done in a monastery. He was also one of the first to bring the practice of zazen to Israel.

J: When did you first go out east?

We went at the end of 1985- We (Irit and I) got married and went. I had thought it wouldn’t be for a long time, but Tzvi had always told me to leave this place and not to hang around him. I wanted to be with him, I was sure that it would take a lifetime to learn all that he had to teach, but he urged me to go out into the world and look at other things. My wife also strongly encouraged me to go look at other things. And that’s what we did.

J:  What would you say were the most important elements that you found while you were in Japan and  China?

I learned about processes. It’s hard to speak of specific elements. The first thing was how to learn. What it is to seriously learn. It influenced me deeply in  how I saw things. I learned I could see things differently, I could do things that I’d thought were impossible. I learned that it is possible, there is a way, the mind has a lot of strength  if used properly.  This would be the most important thing.

I also got acquainted with chi – I felt the sensation of chi. Before that,  I hadn’t really known what it was. But in the east, it was very clear – I knew when Chi emerged. It was more than a feeling of the flow. I knew chi, beyond all doubt, very clearly. Especially in a group exercise, when others had the same experience and we all felt it. It was obvious that we were not imagining or fantasizing, but that it was real.

J: What do you try to impart to your students?

First of all, I would be very happy if I could awaken within them an inner curiousity. And with that, a broader look at the world around them.  If a connection can be made in those two realms,  a person is taken to a better place where every day is a little better than the day before. There is an underlying feeling that everything is okay.

Ruti, Eliyahu, Miki, Bracha - T'ai Chi in Nir-Oz

J: Can anyone do t’ai chi? Everybody can do it

J: What about Chi Cong.  Can you explain what it is?

It is similar to T’ai Chi, but it emphasizes the energetic side, teaching us to learn to recognize it and to control it. Someone who is strong in Chi Cong can truly help others.

Peter Green

J: There are different forms of Chi Cong that you teach. Could you briefly mention a few and explain them?

There are many series of Chi Cong. Most of them work on improving posture, balance, to remedy disease or unbalanced emotions. They all work to increase chi and its balance. That’s the most important aim.

There are some very static forms and others dynamic, some very dynamic like shaolin. One form, for example, used in almost all schools is The Five Elements, or Five Postures (as called by the Chinese).

These are static positions which are held, then changed, from position to position, relating to the Chinese five elements and addressing the five pairs of organs in the body. This is a little different to what we know in the West.

The elements relate to the natural cycle of energy that flows between these five pairs of bodily organs.

The Five Elements balances the mental, emotional, hormonal energies within the organs, themselves,  and in their relationship with one another.

Another series is called the Eight Pieces of Brocade. It is also one of the ancient series, getting its name from the lace from which the Caesars’ robes were made, a  very expensive cloth. The Eight Pieces do major work on all aspects of health; one on cartilage, another on the skeleton and others on the seven emotions (joy-anger, happiness-sadness, etc).

One works on the nervous system, another on the immune system. It does thorough work.

Another series of Chi Cong is the Wild Goose, which develops the body and awareness through movement. It is one of the few Chi Cong cutta –(a dynamic series of movements). Most are static.

Because it’s not too technical and fairly easy to do, it improves coordination, orientation, and body awareness in general. There are a few forms of the Wild Goose. They all open up energetic channels, providing a good base for other movement or awareness work, no matter what it might be.

It works specifically on the immune system.

Doing almost any form of Chi Cong will relax the body, relieve tiredness, awaken the body. It can dissolve negative emotions including anger. People feel good afterwards  and don’t think of negativity.

J: Would you say that t’ai chi has changed you?

In many ways.

First, when I was young, I would get angry quickly, and I was easily frustrated. At times, I even got violent. My attitudes about life were set and inflexible. All these things changed. I was suddenly able to relax, through my own control, something I never could have done before. I could deal with my frustration in a kind of dialogue.  I learned (perhaps by myself) that the world was nicer than I had thought. Of course, there’s no shortage of things to fix and I wish that things were different but it’s not as bad as we think.  There are many issues in the world, whether individual or on a universal scale that I once assumed were lost causes, beyond anything I could do. Now I think I can influence things, by every positive action that I take.

J:  Do you see T’ai chi making a change in your students?

Yes, certainly.

I have many students, thank god, everyone different, in personality, in their reasons for coming. I can see where it doesn’t work. Not everyone is ready or open to doing t’ai chi. But definitely, as they become more aware of their movements and improve, I can see how it also influences their approach to themselves and to the world. I have seen self-deprecating people who suddenly recognize their own abilities to do things. And for some, it’s a true discovery, allowing them to explore totally new things in their lives. Tai chi is a vehicle to self-awareness.

J:  You have a very gentle way of teaching. You target one particular point for a student to work on and help them focus on observation and correction. Is this a method that other teachers use, or is it your own particular technique?

Yes. This is one of the things I learned with Tzvi, and in Japan or China, but mostly in Japan, during a very intensive period. When I arrived there to do T’ai Chi, I  searched for something similar to what I had been doing with Tzvi. But, I couldn’t find the same style. There were many styles, of course, but due to my own state, I was unable to adapt. Nothing seemed to suit me. Also I had no criteria with which to judge what was good or not. Then a friend of mine who was studying acupuncture invited me to a monastery to watch a T’ai Chi class. I went there and suddenly, it didn’t matter about the style:  I saw the teacher, a woman, and how she moved, her very being, her aura and I wanted her to help me get to her level. Wherever she was, I wanted to be there.

The teaching was very gentle, very harmonious. People were never reprimanded. Sometimes, I missed that, sometimes I felt as if I needed to be hit on the head. In China, they would do things like that to awaken awareness. When required,   I sometimes use that technique, but afterwards I feel badly for doing it.

In Japan, however, they were very gentle, focusing on one thing. When I was an assistant-teacher, I used to show a person everything that needed adjustment. But it’s impossible to remember so many corrections, and I learned to look for the most central thing. People are able to work on one thing, and if central enough,  other things will be corrected as well. And that will open up the possibility of working on something else. The issue for the teacher is to locate the center of the problem. When I look at a person, I look for what is being done right, and I emphasize the positive. That way I can see more clearly where the interference might be coming from. In getting to that central thing, you solve more than one area.

J: You give several T’ai Chi classes in the Negev area, including kibbutzim and the University. Do you find  any noticeable difference in the classroom atmosphere?

Yes, every community has a separate personality, making it special.  I work in different sorts of communities and the atmosphere is very different in each.

Eran, Razia and Doron

For example, I work with the elderly and I work with a younger group of pensioners.  With one group, I am not expecting them to be t’ai chi masters, not at all, but we work with the here and now, what is possible in the lesson and what will remain with each person after they leave the class. What is unique in working with that group is that there is a very harmonious feeling in the room. With the slightly younger pensioners, on the other hand, there can erupt some rather angry dialogues, in the middle of the lesson. It’s very interesting that the lesson sets the stage for such discussions. I am not a part of the particular stories, but since it happens in my lesson, I have to deal with it. I can either ignore it or relate to it. The fact that I can dissolve any negativity that might develop is very satisfying. Sometimes, I can deal with it in a joking manner and that can transform the entire situation. So although such things are not directly connected to t’ai chi, they can constitute a major part of the lesson.

J:  Are there any other questions you wish I had asked, or any comments you’d like to add?

Yes, I have a question: I often find myself wanting to give more than students apparently want. When I first came back to Israel, society in general tended to be more attracted to holistic practices but, in recent years, that has lessened. The fact is that I don’t understand why people don’t gravitate more to t’ai chi. Or to yoga or meditation. Why aren’t more people doing these things?

We are at a period in society where most people are good people, clever people trying to live well. But they focus on the external. They devote attention to their car’s colour, its radio, its GPS, but not to the engine or the gear. This is why they work extra hours, make one more deal. Even nurses will take care of one more patient, instead of going home, instead of paying attention to the time or to themselves. They themselves could be sick, but they don’t offer themselves the attention they give so freely to others. Why must an actual illness force people to finally pay attention,  when it can so easily be prevented.

It takes awareness to maintain the body. More people need to make a connection to themselves.

This brings back the point I made earlier. The essential thing is to arouse a true curiousity in the self and when that happens, a person will be able to see what is required, aware of what’s important in life.

Is it really necessary to have a better looking car, a larger TV, or is it more important to feel healthier, better nourished inside?

If one’s priorities are in order, one feels inner contentment and nothing external can change that feeling.

If you are happy, you are happyl Receiving a gift is always nice,  but it all starts on the inside. That’s the place to start.

Doron

 

Thank you, Doron.

Doron Lavie : T’ai Chi and Chi Cong classes are given from Sunday to Friday. For inquiries about classes in t’ai chi, chi cong, zen meditation and kung fu, contact Doron. Email: idl@bezeqint.net   Telephone: 08-651-2636

Doron has been teaching Chi Cong and T’ai Chi on Kibbutz Nir-Oz  since 1993, on Tuesday nights from 20:30 – 22:00. For information about classes given on Kibbutz Nir-Oz, e-mail: thisjudih@gmail.com

Doron offers clarification

 

Watch a short clip of Doron illustrating a point in ‘Wave Hands Like Clouds’ (Hebrew spoken, but useful to watch)

More Toddlers, Young Children Given Antipsychotics – BusinessWeek

 

 

 

 

More Toddlers, Young Children Given Antipsychotics – BusinessWeek.

– These findings are more than worrisome. Take a look at the article –

More Toddlers, Young Children Given Antipsychotics

Researchers question the ‘worrisome’ trend

MONDAY, Jan. 4 (HealthDay News) — The rate of children aged 2 to 5 who are given antipsychotic medications has doubled in recent years, a new study has found.

Yet little is known about either the effectiveness or the safety of these powerful psychiatric medications in children this age, said researchers from Columbia University and Rutgers University, who looked at data on more than 1 million children with private health insurance.

“It is a worrisome trend, partly because very little is known about the short-term, let alone the long-term, safety of these drugs in this age group,” said study author Dr. Mark Olfson, a professor of clinical psychiatry at Columbia University in New York City.

Prescribing antipsychotics to children in the upper range of that age span — ages 4 and 5 — is justifiable only in rare, intractable situations in which all other treatments, including family and psychological therapy, have been tried and are not working, Olfson said.

And it’s questionable whether 2- and 3-year-olds should ever be prescribed antipsychotics, Olfson said.

The study is published in the January issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry…..

Click onto the link to read the rest of the article.

I don’t know what you’re seeing in your school or immediate area, but I’m seeing many children with miniscule attention spans popping up to look for junkfood, cola, candy. Nutrition could be a big part of what we’re seeing, but if one zeroes in on purely neurological conditions, are we indeed seeing such a growth in the number of little children who need medication?

One wonders.

Especially since we don’t know what long-term effects will be invoked by such early medication. Or, is it possible that early medication could successfully prevent further exacerbation of a condition?

Comments?

Trapped in the ADHD-industrial complex, article by Katherine Ellison

I came upon this article this morning in a forum for ADD. Katherine Ellison did some personal research for herself and her son and her findings are worth reading. Everything she tried leads up to a good doable daily routine which she mentions towards the end. Here’s an excerpt, but please click on the link to read the entire piece – judih.

Stacy Innerst / Post Gazette

KATHERINE ELLISON tells one mother’s story of struggling to cope with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder

Sunday, December 05, 2010

As the mother of a teenager who was diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in 2004, I wasn’t surprised to read the new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that said the number of ADHD cases in children jumped by 22 percent between 2003 and 2007 — an increase of 1 million kids.

From the day my son started school, I’ve watched popular awareness of the disabling distraction rise, to the point where it’s easy to believe the CDC estimate that one in 10 U.S. children — 5.4 million kids — now has ADHD, as reported by their families. This might even be positive news, in that at least some kids who need medical attention are getting it.

go to link: http://post-gazette.com/pg/10339/1108046-109.stm?cmpid=newspanel

just one more quote:

I am relieved to report that despite many setbacks, my son and I made some progress by the end of my year. I suspect that his time on medication helped us out of a crisis and gave him a useful taste of what it felt like to have more self-control. It may also be true that our budget-breaking neurofeedback treatments helped curb his irritability and my anxiety.

I also discovered that some of the most effective interventions are also the simplest and cheapest, such as educating myself enough to know how much of my son’s behavior is truly within his control and getting in the habit of finding something to praise about him every day.

Read more: http://post-gazette.com/pg/10339/1108046-109.stm?cmpid=newspanel#ixzz17IzPoaf0

 

 

N.Y. school honors Jewish athlete banned by Nazis – Haaretz Daily Newspaper | Israel News

N.Y. school honors Jewish athlete banned by Nazis – Haaretz Daily Newspaper | Israel News.

Since December, 2009, I’ve been studying an online course given by Sheryl Ochayon from Yad Vashem’s International School for Holocaust Studies, an online educational institute.

The course is Germany: 1918 – 1943. We’ve studied each period of time in a series of 12 installments. My final project is on this wonderful woman, Margaret Lambert who was formerly known as Gretel Bergmann. (The courses are interesting, thorough and involve readings and writing short essay style answers. Check them out)

So, today, how good it felt to click onto Ha’aretz.com to find this link.

Read the article and notice how strong this woman is today at the age of 96. Note the question and her answer:

Asked earlier what message she would pass on to the young athletes who will compete at the Margaret Lambert Track and Field in New York, she said, “I hope they keep it honest and stay away from steroids.”

New Changes for ADHD Diagnosis in DSM-V May Mean Treating ADD Seperately from ADHD | Attention Deficit Disorder News – ADDitude

New Changes for ADHD Diagnosis in DSM-V May Mean Treating ADD Seperately from ADHD | Attention Deficit Disorder News – ADDitude.

No More ADHD? New Changes to the Guidelines for Diagnosing Children and Adults

As the mental health experts go back to the drawing board, expect updates to the current guidelines for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis, age of onset, and symptoms. The label ADHD or ADD may even go away, or at the very least, change meaning.

My comment: Further talk on the DSM-V, and some readers’ comments.